Quantum computing and condensed matter physics with microwave photons

Digital Quantum Simulators in a Scalable Architecture of Hybrid Spin-Photon Qubits

A. Chiesa, P. Santini, D. Gerace, J. Raftery, A. A. Houck, and S. Carretta

Resolving quantum many-body problems represents one of the greatest challenges in physics and physical chemistry, due to the prohibitively large computational resources that would be required by using classical computers. A solution has been foreseen by directly simulating the time evolution through sequences of quantum gates applied to arrays of qubits, i.e. by implementing a digital quantum simulator.

Broadband Filters for Abatement of Spontaneous Emission in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

Nicholas T. Bronn, Yanbing Liu, Jared B. Hertzberg, Antonio D. C ́orcoles, Andrew A. Houck, Jay M. Gambetta, and Jerry M. Chow

 

Imaging Photon Lattice States by Scanning Defect Microscopy

D. L. Underwood, W. E. Shanks, Andy C. Y. Li, Lamia Ateshian, Jens Koch, A. A. Houck

Microwave photons inside lattices of coupled resonators and superconducting qubits can exhibit surprising matter-like behavior. Realizing such open-system quantum simulators presents an experimental challenge and requires new tools and measurement techniques. Here, we introduce Scanning Defect Microscopy as one such tool and illustrate its use in mapping the normal-mode structure of microwave photons inside a 49-site Kagome lattice of coplanar waveguide resonators. Scanning is accomplished by moving a probe equipped with a sapphire tip across the lattice.

Beyond Strong Coupling in a Massively Multimode Cavity

Neereja M. Sundaresan, Yanbing Liu, Darius Sadri, Laszlo J. Szocs, Devin L. Underwood, Moein Malekakhlagh, Hakan E. Tureci, Andrew A. Houck

The study of light-matter interaction has seen a resurgence in recent years, stimulated by highly controllable, precise, and modular experiments in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). The achievement of strong coupling, where the coupling between a single atom and fundamental cavity mode exceeds the decay rates, was a major milestone that opened the doors to a multitude of new investigations. Here we introduce multimode strong coupling (MMSC), where the coupling is comparable to the free spectral range (FSR) of the cavity, i.e.

Observation of a Dissipation-Induced Classical to Quantum Transition

James Raftery, Darius Sadri, Sebastian Schmidt, Hakan E. Türeci, Andrew A. Houck

The emergence of non-trivial structure in many-body physics has been a central topic of research bearing on many branches of science. Important recent work has explored the non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of closed many-body systems. Photonic systems offer a unique platform for the study of open quantum systems. We report here the experimental observation of a novel dissipation driven dynamical localization transition of strongly correlated photons in an extended superconducting circuit.

Time-reversal symmetrization of spontaneous emission for quantum state transfer

Srikanth J. Srinivasan, Neereja M. Sundaresan, Darius Sadri, Yanbing Liu, Jay M. Gambetta, Terri Yu, S. M. Girvin, and Andrew A. Houck

We demonstrate the ability to control the spontaneous emission from a superconducting qubit coupled to a cavity. The time domain profile of the emitted photon is shaped into a symmetric truncated exponential. The experiment is enabled by a qubit coupled to a cavity, with a coupling strength that can be tuned in tens of nanoseconds while maintaining a constant dressed state emission frequency. Symmetrization of the photonic wave packet will enable use of photons as flying qubits for transfering the quantum state between atoms in distant cavities.